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Terrorism in France :Scenes of horror as a Paris night becomes a bloodbath-live updates

Scenes of horror as a Paris night becomes a bloodbath.




Paris terror attacks: eight attackers dead after killing at least 126 people 

  • At least 120 people are feared to have been killed in a series of devastating attacks across Paris.
  • Eight attackers also died, police say, seven of them by detonating explosive suicide belts.
  • Police continue to search for accomplices who might still be at large.
  • Two hundred people were injured, 80 of them seriously.
  • Shootings and explosions were reported in six locations across the city, including the Stade de France in northern Paris, where two suicide attacks and a bombing took place as the national team played Germany in a friendly football match.
  • The majority of victims died after a mass shooting inside the Bataclan concert venue.
  • Shootings also took place in restaurants and other sites in the centre of the city
The attacks were launched in six separate locations across the city – five in 
the 10th and 11th arrondissements, and one close to the Stade de France, in the
north of the city, where president Fran├žois Hollande was attending a football
match between the French and German teams.
Here is what we know about the places where the shootings and explosions took
place.


Le Bataclan concert venue
The club is on Boulevard Voltaire, a lively neighbourhood at the intersection
of the 10th, 11th and third arrondissements.

One of the best-known music venues in Paris, the Bataclan was hosting
California-based band Eagles of Death Metal on Friday night. Band members are reported safe, although the whereabouts of their entourage are unconfirmed.

This was the site where most of the victims – many of them young – were killed.

The attackers first sprayed cafes outside the concert hall with machine
gunfire, then went inside and opened fire on the panicked audience, according to
the Paris police chief.


As police closed in, three of them detonated suicide vests, killing
themselves and setting off explosions.

Map showing the
locations of terror attacks in Paris on 13 November 2015. Map showing the
locations of terror attacks in Paris on 13 November 2015.

Stade de France

Two suicide attacks and a bombing were carried out simultaneously near the
national stadium.

The attacks occurred near two of the stadium entrances and at a nearby
McDonald’s restaurant, according to Gregory Goupil of the Alliance Police
Nationale, whose region includes the area around the stadium. He said at least
three people died in the attacks.

Spectators were evacuated from the 80,000-seat venue, many of them singing
the Marseillaise as they did so.



La Belle Equipe

The sidewalk terrace of the cafe on Rue de Charonne was showered in gunfire,
killing as many as 18 people, according to the Paris prosecutor.

Emergency workers covered bodies splayed on the pavement.

Le Carillon and Le Petit Cambodge

Le Carillon, a bar-cafe, and the nearby Cambodian restaurant Le Petit
Cambodge were apparently both targeted with gunfire, killing around 14 people
and leaving several gravely injured, according to the prosecutor.


They are at the junction of Rue Bichat and Rue Alibert.


Witnesses described sounds like fireworks, before they realised the gravity
of the situation and tried to find a place to hide, or flee.

Medics evacuate
an injured person close to Le Bataclan. 



People light candles at a vigil outside the French consulate
in Montreal, Friday. ()


The assailants' weapons were those of war: automatic rifles and suicide belts
of explosives. The killing was indiscriminate, spread across a swath of the
city, in at least six different sites. An ordinary Friday night in Paris
transformed into a bloodbath. The word Parisians used over and over as they
tried to make sense of the horror was "carnage."


At the packed Bataclan concert hall in eastern Paris, the attackers opened
fire on a crowd waiting to hear American rock band Eagles of Death Metal
perform. One witness told France Info radio he heard them yell "Allahu Akbar" —
God is great in Arabic — as they started their killing spree and took hostages.
The city's police chief, Michel Cadot, said the assailants also wore explosive
belts, which they detonated.


About a mile (1.5 kilometers) from there, attackers sprayed gunfire at the
Belle Equipe bar, busy as ever on a Friday night with patrons unwinding from
their week. One witness, also speaking to French radio, said the dead and
wounded dropped "like flies" and that "there was blood everywhere. You feel very
alone in moments like that."


The preliminary death toll there appeared to be 18 dead, Paris prosecutor
Francois Molins said. White sheets were laid over bodies.


To the north, loud explosions reverberated around the national stadium,
packed with some 80,000 fans watching France beat Germany in a soccer exhibition
match. One of the loud detonations in the chill air so startled French player
Patrice Evra that he paused in mid-run, seemingly lost, and kicked away the
ball.


A police union official, Gregory Goupil, said the two explosions were suicide
attacks and a bombing that killed at least three people — near two of the
entrances to the stadium and a McDonalds. The stadium was the first site
targeted.


From there, the wave of killings quickly spread.

There were 14 dead on one street, five on another, Molins said. The spread of
the killings added to the confusion and made a coherent picture slow to form.
But the shock was instantaneous, as was the understanding that this was terror
and killing on a scale unseen in Paris since World War II.


"The terrorists, the assassins, sprayed the outsides of several cafes with
machine guns and went inside," Cadot, the police chief, said. "So there were
victims in terrible and atrocious states in numerous places."


Pierre-Henri Lombard was dining in a restaurant in the trendy neighborhood
when he heard sounds like the fireworks for France's Bastille Day national
holiday.


Then the panic began.

"Waiters went outside and said it was a shooting. We saw dozens of people
rundown the street, a couple were bleeding," he said.


As police, soldiers and the emergency services sprang into action, sirens
wailing, helicopters whirring overhead, medical personnel started reporting for
work of their own accord to help treat the injured. Five subway lines were shut
down entirely, and Paris police told people to stay at home and avoid going out
unless absolutely necessary.


At the Bataclan, police launched an assault to free hostages. Haggard-looking
survivors were bused away.


At the stadium, fans streamed onto the pitch after the match, preferring the
relative safety of inside of the stadium to the chaos outside. Police forensic
officers dressed in white scoured the blast sites for evidence.


French President Francois Hollande was quickly evacuated from the stadium and
soon after declared a state of emergency. (kes)


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